All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?: Learn what the means through example!

What does “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” mean?

"All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" means that it is not always easy to predict or understand a person's character, even if they seem good or trustworthy on the surface. The proverb warns against making assumptions or judgments based solely on appearances, and reminds us to be cautious in our relationships with others.

What context can I use the in?

Example

She seemed like such a nice person, but all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?. I guess you can never really know someone.

Example

They say beauty is only skin deep, and all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives? reminds us that appearances can be deceiving.

Example

He may seem like the perfect husband, but all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?. It's important to look beyond the surface

Is “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” an expression, an idiom, or a proverb?

“All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” is a proverb. A proverb is a short saying that teaches us something important or gives us advice. Unlike an idiom, it’s easy to understand even if it uses figurative language.

How would I use “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” effectively in context?

You can use "All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" to caution against making assumptions or judgments based solely on appearances. It reminds us that it's not always easy to predict or understand a person's character, even if they seem good or trustworthy on the surface. For example, if a friend is considering entering into a new relationship, you might say, 'Remember, "all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?". Take your time and get to know them better before making any commitments.'

  • 1Friendship

    She seemed like such a nice person, but all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?. I guess you can never really know someone.

  • 2Appearances

    They say beauty is only skin deep, and all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives? reminds us that appearances can be deceiving.

  • 3Relationships

    He may seem like the perfect husband, but all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?. It's important to look beyond the surface.

Similar phrases to “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?”:

Don't judge a book by its cover

To not form an opinion about someone or something based solely on appearances

Example

He may look tough, but don't judge a book by its cover. He's actually very kind-hearted.

What someone does is more important than what they say they will do

Example

She promised to help, but actions speak louder than words. She never showed up.

The true value or quality of something can only be judged by experiencing or testing it

Example

He claims his product is the best, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating. Let's try it and see.

Good things to know:

Where does the phrase “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” come from?

The origin of the phrase "All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" is unknown.

Is “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” common in everyday conversation?

The phrase "All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" is not commonly used in everyday conversation. It is an old proverb that may not be familiar to many people, especially those who are not familiar with English proverbs.

What tone does “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” have?

"All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" conveys a tone of caution and skepticism. It warns against making assumptions or judgments based solely on appearances and encourages a deeper understanding of others.

Can “All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?” be used in informal and formal settings?

The phrase "All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" is more formal in nature. It is not commonly used in casual conversations but may be used in more formal settings such as literature, academic discussions, or when discussing moral or philosophical concepts.

Can it be used by itself, or is it usually part of a sentence?

The phrase "All are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?" is typically used as part of a sentence to convey its full meaning. For example, 'She seemed trustworthy, but "all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?". I decided to investigate further.' However, in some cases, it can be understood even if used alone, such as saying 'Remember, "all are good lasses, but whence come the bad wives?".' to caution against making assumptions based on appearances.

Synonyms & Antonyms

Synonyms

  • look before you leap
  • appearances can be deceiving
  • don't be fooled by appearances
  • looks can be deceiving
  • trust but verify

Antonyms

  • judge a book by its cover
  • believe at face value
  • take things at face value
  • trust blindly
  • jump to conclusions

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